Information

An independent contractor agreement is a legal document between a business and an independent contractor, freelancer or subcontractor. It’s an all-encompassing document that outlines the details of the work to be performed, terms of the agreement, deliverables, compensation and any additional clauses. Through our platform, we connect you to verified lawyers who provide timely solutions to your needs.

Clauses :-

  • What to Include in an Independent Contractor Agreement ?

    All contracts between employer and contractor should include basic information, such as contract terms, a detailed description of the work to be done, payment information, confidentiality agreements and even documentation on how to resolve issues should a disagreement occur. In addition, contracts should be signed by both parties.

  • Terms

    The terms of the agreement include the names of the business and subcontractor, work location, date of the contract, and a high-level description of the project with details of the job to be performed.

  • Responsibilities & Deliverables

    Responsibilities and deliverables for an independent contractor include what work they’ll do or what deliverables (goods and/or services) they’ll provide.

  • Compensation & Payment Criteria

    Provide compensation details and include how and when the contractor will be paid. A best practice is not to pay an hourly rate but rather a fixed rate for completion of the project with payments made at specific milestones.

  • Confidentiality & Noncompete Agreements

    These additional agreements typically benefit the business by protecting proprietary information and customer data.

  • Insurance Requirements

    Often, a business will require a subcontractor to maintain insurance coverage for liability and vehicles while they are doing work at the business location. If the subcontractor also has employees, additional insurance, such as worker’s compensation, is required.

  • Nonperformance Clause

    An employer often has projects stacked on a timeline. If one subcontractor fails to complete work to standards or on time, it can throw the entire project off schedule. The nonperformance clause can help prevent that.

Benefits

  1. Reduce Complexity
  2. Assure Confidentiality
  3. Provide Assurance
  4. Minimum Legal Liability
  5. Precise Understanding of Terms
Information

An independent contractor agreement is a legal document between a business and an independent contractor, freelancer or subcontractor. It’s an all-encompassing document that outlines the details of the work to be performed, terms of the agreement, deliverables, compensation and any additional clauses. Through our platform, we connect you to verified lawyers who provide timely solutions to your needs.

  • What to Include in an Independent Contractor Agreement ?

    All contracts between employer and contractor should include basic information, such as contract terms, a detailed description of the work to be done, payment information, confidentiality agreements and even documentation on how to resolve issues should a disagreement occur. In addition, contracts should be signed by both parties.

  • Terms

    The terms of the agreement include the names of the business and subcontractor, work location, date of the contract, and a high-level description of the project with details of the job to be performed.

  • Responsibilities & Deliverables

    Responsibilities and deliverables for an independent contractor include what work they’ll do or what deliverables (goods and/or services) they’ll provide.

  • Compensation & Payment Criteria

    Provide compensation details and include how and when the contractor will be paid. A best practice is not to pay an hourly rate but rather a fixed rate for completion of the project with payments made at specific milestones.

  • Confidentiality & Noncompete Agreements

    These additional agreements typically benefit the business by protecting proprietary information and customer data.

  • Insurance Requirements

    Often, a business will require a subcontractor to maintain insurance coverage for liability and vehicles while they are doing work at the business location. If the subcontractor also has employees, additional insurance, such as worker’s compensation, is required.

  • Nonperformance Clause

    An employer often has projects stacked on a timeline. If one subcontractor fails to complete work to standards or on time, it can throw the entire project off schedule. The nonperformance clause can help prevent that.

  1. Reduce Complexity
  2. Assure Confidentiality
  3. Provide Assurance
  4. Minimum Legal Liability
  5. Precise Understanding of Terms